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Healthy Eating to Lose Weight

Hungry? Step away from the snack machine. Control your cravings and keep track of your calories here.

How often do you get home too tired to cook, struggle with what to eat, and end up ordering takeout?

Sadly, that 30 extra minutes of cardio doesn't make it OK to polish off the rest of the office cupcakes.

A century ago, the tapeworm diet was in. Our grandmas swore by the cabbage soup diet while our moms turned to Atkins.

With all the hype surrounding kale, it's easy to forget that there are other greens with major nutritional benefits that are also supremely tasty. Spolier alert: There are.

Ugh, bloating. It's a guaranteed way to make you feel sluggish at the gym—and it can give you second thoughts about slipping into your favorite pair of skinny jeans.

Every teacher you had growing up probably told you that cheating was inherently a bad thing. And in most instances, it is.

"Fat is flavor" might be a popular expression among foodies, but it's only one way to add oomph to a dish.

Being on a diet doesn't have to mean being hangry. The key? Tasty eats (like popcorn!) that are shown to stave off hunger.

You've just gotten used to the idea of drinking your salad and already another new juice trend has popped up. But is the latest "it" ingredient worth the hype? We have the juicy truth.

Why suffer through drinking only greens when you can grab a spoon and enjoy a real liquid meal? We sip the trend.

"You've gained weight." Those were my doctor's first words at my checkup last year. Ouch. I knew that I had been stress eating, and the result was an extra eight pounds on my 5-foot-1-inch frame.

The stuffing, gingerbread cookies and peppermint bark are gone, but new research shows you're probably putting away even more calories than you were over the holidays.

Up to your ears in leftovers? Throwing out all that perfectly good food seems like a waste, but eating turkey and apple pie for a month doesn't sound like a great plan, either.

New research finds you can lose weight by making this small change—and it has nothing to do with consuming fewer calories.

There's a new way to boost your metabolism—and it starts at your next meal.

Who has the willpower to resist the deluge of pumpkin-flavored-everything right now? (Not us!) We refuse to choose between festive fall treats and our skinny jeans.

Pass up homemade bread or dinner out with her husband? No way, says Daphne Oz, a new mom and a cohost of The Chew.