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Location #7: Turkey

Written on February 12, 2014 at 1:15 pm , by

Paige and Heather sit among ancient ruins in Turkey. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11)

Paige and Heather sit among ancient ruins in Turkey. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige climbed in Turkey to support CARE, which combats global poverty. Help Paige raise $10,000 for CARE on her Crowdrise page.

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By Paige Claassen

A marathon runner will likely earn sloth status in a sprint. A road cycler is prone to a few bruises on a mountain bike course. Put a technical sport climber on a horizontal roof and watch them flounder and fall. We’re all assumed to be experts in our respective sport, career, or hobby. But seemingly subtle variations from the outside actually make a big impact when you’re the one in the driver’s seat.

I spent the month of January climbing the steep limestone roofs of Geyikbayiri, Turkey. Typically, I prefer vertical climbs that require precise footwork, strong fingers, and technical movement. Alternatively, the rock in Turkey offers a much steeper, more powerful and physical style of climbing. My attempts to navigate the stalactite roof features left me feeling disoriented, as though I was underwater and didn’t know which way was up.

As with other styles of climbing, roof climbing is a very specific skill that requires dedicated practice. Roofs often require climbers to lead with their feet rather than hands. Surprisingly, roof climbs often offer “no hands rests,” whereby a climber can wedge their knees against features and let go of the rock with both hands. Unfortunately, my skillset does not lend itself to this style of climbing. I struggle to identify sections of the route where I can let go with both hands, or where I should climb feet first.

Paige navigates the sea of roof features, such as the stalactite in the foreground. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11)

Paige navigates the sea of roof features, such as the stalactite in the foreground. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Challenges within our own field of expertise can leave us frustrated and disheartened, when we struggle with a feat that we “should” be capable of performing. However, these obstacles offer unique opportunities to grow within our field. Likely, improvement in one area of our trade can only help us in our given specialty.

With this in mind, I tried to learn all I could about roof climbing in Turkey from my friend and fellow visiting American climber, Heather Weidner. I observed Heather’s seemingly effortless roof maneuvers. She gracefully twisted around the same stalactites I had tried to climb over. Whereas I saw a blank section of rock with no holds, save a 90 degree angle I couldn’t possibly grab, Heather saw an opportunity to “knee bar” and let go with her hands. After a few weeks of Heather’s instruction, I felt more comfortable identifying rests and tricky movements. What once felt impossible suddenly didn’t seem so unreasonable.

This is why I love to climb. Each route offers a new obstacle, a new chance to learn, and a fresh start. Thanks for showing me the way through the roofs, Heather!

Heather Weidner demonstrates a "no hands rest." Photo by Paige Claassen.

Heather Weidner demonstrates a “no hands rest.” Photo by Paige Claassen.

Did you know that women and girls make up 70 percent of the world’s 1 billion poorest people? Or that a child born to a literate mother is 50 percent more likely to survive past the age of 5? These are statistics from CARE, a Lead Now supported organization that helps the poorest communities in the world unleash their full potential. Help Lead Now support CARE by donating online at http://www.crowdrise.com/leadnowturkey. Contribute $27 or more for a chance to win a Marmot two-person tent!

To get involved and donate online to help, visit Crowdrise.

Check back next month for a video and update about Paige’s next location. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in Turkey! FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video .

Location #6: India

Written on January 13, 2014 at 9:55 am , by

Local indian girls share a laugh and bright smiles with Paige's team. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Local indian girls share a laugh and bright smiles with Paige’s team. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige climbed in India to support Apne Aap Women Worldwide, which works to combat sexual exploitation of women and girls. Help Paige raise $10,000 for Apne Aap on her Crowdrise page and don’t miss this bonus video from Louder Than 11 about the three million women currently trapped in prostitution

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By Paige Claassen

In our society, we strive towards a similar ideal. Whether that comes in the form of a high ranking, high paying job, a slender waist, or elegant clothes, the model women of magazines all look much the same. We’re praised for creating our own paths and for defining ourselves as individuals; but if we step too far outside the box, our motives might be questioned. I, for example, am currently traveling around the world to rock climb. I’m not earning a salary, I haven’t worn makeup or fixed my hair in months, and I don’t have a permanent home. The path I’m taking is not straight, it’s not predictable, and I don’t know what’s around the next bend.

I spent the month of December in India, and my goal was to climb the hardest route in India, called Ganesh and graded 5.14a. Unfortunately, the hot Indian sun beat down on Ganesh all day, making it nearly impossible to climb. I woke up at 5 a.m. each day to put in my attempts before the sun rose at 7 a.m. My day ended at 9 a.m., when I walked away from the cliff, dripping in sweat, hair disheveled, and frustrated with my efforts. This route lent itself better to a male’s strengths. The moves were long and powerful and I would need to channel all my strength and motivation to complete this climb.

A beautiful sunset and a monkey. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

A beautiful sunset and a monkey. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Meanwhile, India offered a few additional obstacles of its own. The small, dusty town I visited had a reputation for inflicting the dreaded traveller’s diarrhea on visiting foreigners (which I did not avoid). A high risk of malaria in the region also had me taking preventative medication, rumored to have a variety of unpleasant side effects. Oily food, few fresh fruits and vegetables, and no opportunities to run or cross train provided further fitness challenges.

But I had traveled all this way for one route, which was one of the best in the world. I knew I was capable. So with that determination, the matter was settled. I punched through the long moves that a girl isn’t supposed to be capable of doing. I finished the route, and I finished it before the boys. A little extra icing on the cake!

It's one big move after another, says Paige about Ganesh. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige Claassen becomes the first female to ever ascend Ganesh, the most difficult sport climb in India. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

I realized that my path, with all its turns and unknowns and new challenges each month, is a path of choices. Sure, India wasn’t the most comfortable month of travel, but it was a month I’ll never forget. The sites I saw, the people, and the colors each left their own special imprint in my mind and opened my eyes to a new world.

Paige got to know a few local Indian women while on her trip. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige got to know a few local Indian women while on her trip. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Part of that world is beautiful, but deep scars lay behind the beauty. Lead Now’s non-profit partner in India, Apne Aap, offered a glimpse into the struggles many women in India face.  Apne Aap says that “every year, nearly two million people are trafficked for sexual exploitation; of these, the vast majority are female, and half are aged 12-16.”  This is a statistic I can’t even begin to grasp, but I want to do what I can in reducing that figure so that other women can have the choices that I enjoy day to day. Join me by donating online at http://www.crowdrise.com/leadnowtourindia

To get involved and donate online to help combat sexual exploitation, visit Crowdrise.

Check back next month for a video and update about Paige’s next location. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in India! FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video .

LOCATION #5: China

Written on December 23, 2013 at 10:00 am , by

Can you spot Paige climbing on the famous Moon Hill arch in China?

Can you spot Paige climbing on the famous Moon Hill arch in China? Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige climbed in China to support the Colorado flood relief efforts of Foothills United Way. Foothills United Way has established the ‘Foothills Flood Relief Fund’ in response to the impact of the severe flooding across Colorado’s Front Range. The funds raised through this effort will be used toward health and human services for those affected by the flooding in Boulder and Broomfield counties. Help Paige raise $10,000 for Foothills United Way on her Crowdrise page. Donate $27 or more and you’ll be entered into a monthly raffle to win a Marmot tent!

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By Paige Claassen

China can be an intimidating place for foreigners. I remember visiting Beijing eight years ago for the Youth World Championships of rock climbing. Half of the US team suffered from either food poisoning from local restaurants or sore throats from the pollution. As a result, America’s best young climbers relied on Pizza Hut for their pre-competition fuel. The situation was less than ideal.

 Paige belays Ting on her warmup for the day

Paige belays Ting on her warmup for the day. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Memories of my first time in China littered my mind as I drove up to the cliff in Yangshuo last month. Upon arriving, I looked down the cliff line to see a young woman my age bounding around, hanging from trees, and performing calisthenics warm ups.  I’ve learned over the past few months of travel that I have to make new friends everywhere I go. I wanted this girl to be my new friend.

Xiao Ting, or simply Ting as I called her, welcomed me into her world. Rock climbing remains a severely male dominated sport in China, so Ting was as eager to meet another motivated female climber as I was to find a companion I could climb and laugh with. Ting’s lively personality meshed perfectly with my eagerness to embrace this new environment, and over the following three weeks our friendship grew.

Ting taught me her warm up calisthenics (actually a great ab workout!). She pointed out routes she thought I might like. She admitted that she tried harder when climbing with other women because she felt more driven to push herself as an individual rather than rely on her boyfriend Abond (arguably China’s best climber).  Aside from climbing, Ting and I shared an interest in food and nutrition. She wanted to learn to bake western style cakes, so I shared some of my favorite recipe sites with her (I’m a big Smitten Kitchen fan!). In return, Ting introduced me to a new food I can only describe as a collagen rich granola bar, containing sesame seeds, goji berries, nuts, and a few unfamiliar ingredients. She explained that in the winter, she puts the homemade mixture in hot water to make a sort of porridge that is good for digestion after meals and smooth skin.

Ting demonstrates her pre-climbing warmup routine

Ting demonstrates her pre-climbing warmup routine. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

These little tidbits from another young, motivated, and energetic woman made China comfortable. After five months of international travel, I needed a good dose of laughter with a girlfriend. I think the comfort I felt from Ting helped me achieve two of the more difficult routes I have ever completed. One even required me to climb upside down out a horizontal roof. Thanks for the inspiration Ting, I’m thankful to have you as a new friend.

:)

To get involved and donate online to help the Colorado Flood Recovery efforts, visit leadnowtourcoloradoflood.

Check back next month for a video and update about Paige’s next location. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in China! FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video .

Related: Lead Now Tour Main Page

Paige completes Sea of Tranquility (5.14a)

Paige completes Sea of Tranquility (5.14a). Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

LOCATION #4: Japan

Written on November 22, 2013 at 12:56 pm , by

The world’s busiest crosswalk is Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo.

The world’s busiest crosswalk is Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige used the month of October in Japan to raise money for the Colorado flood relief efforts of the American Red Cross. The Red Cross responded immediately to the September flash floods that claimed over 17,000 homes along the Front Range with rescue, food, shelter, care, and comfort for those who suffered severe damage. Help Paige raise $10,000 for the American Red Cross at http://www.crowdrise.com/leadnowtourcolorado. Donate $27 or more and you’ll be entered into a monthly raffle to win a Marmot tent!

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By Paige Claassen

Imagine you’re unable to distinguish between a restaurant and a bank when walking down the street. Going to the grocery store is a three hour event. A busy city street full of people is completely silent. This is Japan, one of the most unique and fascinating countries I’ve ever visited.

‘Organized chaos’ is the only way to truly describe Japan. From the outside, Japan seems cluttered, frantic, and hectic. But focus in and you’ll find perfect order and tidiness. At first, I found Japan intimidating in it’s lack of familiarity. But after a bit of acquaintance, I fell in love with this country, aptly known as the Land of the Rising Sun. Everything is sunny in Japan, except the weather.

I visited Japan in October and encountered an unusually late typhoon season. While my objective was to rock climb, I was forced out of the mountains by torrential rains, a small earthquake, and the threat of tsunamis.

Paige climbs on the Pacific Ocean as a typhoon rolls in.

Paige climbs on the Pacific Ocean as a typhoon rolls in. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Perhaps this interruption in my plans was a blessing in disguise, as it allowed me to dive into the Japanese culture. Here’s what I discovered:

Fresh sashimi from Tsukiji Market, the world’s largest fish market.

Fresh sashimi from Tsukiji Market, the world’s largest fish market. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

  • My new favorite foods: Okonomiyaki (the Japanese pancake, which is nothing like a pancake) and sashimi fresh off the boat, which melts in your mouth like butter. Japan also grows amazing fruits. My favorites were Fuji apples and Asian pears.
  • Bowing: To thank one another, or even to greet or bid farewell, the Japanese people bow. As a foreigner, I found this incredibly convenient, because even when I couldn’t express my gratitude in words, I could smile and bow.
  • Cleanliness: Feeling under the weather? The Japanese wear face masks when feeling ill to prevent the spread of germs out of respect for those around them. Hand rails in public areas are sterilized throughout the day. As a result of this respect for health, I found I could eat nearly anything in Japan. Unrecognizable seafood, street food, and nearly raw eggs served on top of most meals – no problem.
  • Prices: I had always heard Japan was incredibly expensive. In general, I found prices comparable with the US. The few things that will empty your wallet are toll roads, gasoline, and fruit (expect to pay $50 for a cantaloupe and $3 for one apple). On the other hand, I regularly paid $5-$10 for a full meal of sushi at the popular conveyor belt restaurants.
  • 7-Eleven convenience stores: 14,000 7-Eleven stores throughout Japan are open 24 hours a day and provide cheap meals on the go, prepared daily. For a quick, inexpensive, and tasty lunch, this is your stop.
Some sun! Paige enjoys the vibrant fall colors in the Japanese Alps.

Some sun! Paige enjoys the vibrant fall colors in the Japanese Alps. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

I hope these tips help you navigate Japan. While overwhelming at first, I think Japan might actually be a more comfortable and convenient vacation option than Europe. Try it out for yourself!

To get involved and donate online to help the Colorado Flood Recovery efforts, visit leadnowtourcoloradoflood.

Check back next month for a video and update about Location #5. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in Japan! FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video .

Related: Lead Now Tour Main Page

Location #3: ITALY

Written on October 15, 2013 at 1:07 pm , by

Paige Claassen's third stop on her global rock climbing tour? The Italian Alps! Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige Claassen’s third stop on her global rock climbing tour? The Italian Alps! Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Rock climber Paige Claassen recaps her second stop on the Marmot Lead Now Tour, a global tour to inspire people through rock climbing and raise $120,000 for charity organizations.

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By Paige Claassen

We’re all beginners at some point or another. Whether we’re going to a zumba class for the first time or running our first marathon, initially we feel slightly unsure of ourselves. While in Italy on the third stop of the Marmot Lead Now tour, I found myself far from my comfort zone, standing below an intimidating 2,000-foot tall cliff in the Italian Alps. In order to explain my experience, I need to provide a few technical details about rock climbing…

Typically, I sport climb, which means I use a rope and secure myself to pre-existing pieces of equipment on the wall…so no matter where or how often I fall, I’m completely safe. On this particular day in the Alps, I was about to attempt an entirely different objective. This route was 60 times taller than anything I’d ever climbed before, and there were very few pieces of pre existing equipment on the wall. In some places, the route would require me to place my own “temporary” equipment, a concept with which I had little experience, despite my thirteen years of rock climbing.

Falling was not an option, or at least not a preferable option, on this route. If I fell, my equipment would prevent death, but I would likely face serious injuries. On the bright side, this route was far easier in physical difficulty than the routes I’m accustomed to climbing, so I felt confident in my strength. While from the description this may sound like an unwise method of climbing, “multi pitch” climbing as it is called is actually a very popular approach, as it’s the only way to ascend walls taller than 100 or so feet.

Paige making her way 2,000 feet up to the spire with a multi pitch climbing technique. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige making her way 2,000 feet up to the spire with a multi pitch climbing technique. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

I set off towards the summit with an experienced partner whom I trusted, and who was willing to mentor me through new strategies. I learned how to move quickly and efficiently, how to place and trust temporary equipment, and how to ignore the pain in my feet from wearing climbing shoes all day long. After about six hours of climbing, my partner and I reached the final stretch of climbing for the day. I felt accomplished in an entirely new way.

I stood on top of the summit’s spire, gazing at the beautiful scenery 2,000 feet below me and took a deep breath of that mountain air. I had overcome my fears, and the reward was great. While I prefer to attempt climbs that challenge my physical limits, this climb presented a mental challenge. At the end of the day, I believe this is why we try new things. Attempting a feat we’ve never tried before stimulates not only our muscles but also our minds, allowing us to grow in strength, in confidence, and in aptitude.

What new challenge do you want to try?

Paige celebrates after reaching her objective at the top of the spire. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige celebrates after reaching her objective at the top of the spire. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

To get involved and donate online to Paige’s cause in Italy, Save the Children, visit http://www.crowdrise.com/LeadnowtourItaly.

Check back next month for a video and update about Location #4. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in Italy. FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video .

Related: Lead Now Tour Main Page

Location #2: RUSSIA

Written on September 9, 2013 at 9:05 am , by

Washing in the lake is the closest thing to showering at the end of the day. Photo by Jon Glassberg/LT11.

Washing in the lake is the closest thing to showering at the end of the day. Photo by Jon Glassberg/LT11.

Rock climber Paige Claassen recaps her second stop on the Marmot Lead Now Tour, a global tour to inspire people through rock climbing and raise $120,000 for charity organizations.

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By Paige Claassen

When I arrived in Russia, stereotypes plagued my expectations, planting images in my mind of tanks driving down the highway and peasants standing in line for bread rations. But the Russia I encountered was very different from the Russia in my mind. People smiled. Beautiful moss carpeted forests of pines and lakes marked the land. Signs in an alphabet I didn’t understand led me down dirt roads, further into the isolated forest that held my home for the next three weeks, a farmhouse with no running water or electricity.

Meanwhile, I also had a fear that — due to different food and an interrupted workout schedule — I would loose the fitness I had worked so hard to build in South Africa.

These fitness concerns waxed and waned over the following days. My new farm family spoke no English, but I took comfort in their openness to share the country life. We picked berries and mushrooms in the forest and plucked potatoes and carrots from the garden.

Picking berries in the forest just behind the farmhouse. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Picking berries in the forest just behind the farmhouse. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

The Russian family out for a day of spectating while Paige climbs. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

The Russian family out for a day of spectating while Paige climbs. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

“This will work!” coaxed my mind, assured that these familiar, homegrown health foods would keep my muscles strong and lean, the necessary combination for me to climb at my limit. However, Babushka (the Russian grandmother of the house) cooked and recooked everything I ate for the next three weeks in lard. My heart sank as I politely consumed her oily meals, feeling my fitness wash away.

Wandering through the forest one day, I stumbled upon a short climbing route that was protected from the torrential rains. The characters inked into the bottom of the cliff told me this route, named Catharsis, was more difficult than any I had tried before.  With nothing to loose, I gave it a try anyway. Over the next three weeks, I sorted out the moves that had thwarted the efforts of countless men. In ten years, only one climber had completed Catharsis. My goal was to be the second.

Paige attempts Catharsis, the most difficult route at Triangular Lake. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige attempts Catharsis, the most difficult route at Triangular Lake. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

In the end, I came heart-breakingly close to finishing Catharsis, but I ran out of time before I could link through the final move without falling. I felt physically and mentally exhausted. While I didn’t achieve my goal, I found myself stronger and fitter than when I arrived in Russia. I realized that although the my diet and training are crucial to my performance, the true determining factor is motivation. If I push past my own boundaries and try my absolute hardest, I will improve as an athlete. Despite the short-term letdown of leaving Catharsis behind as an unconquered pest, I’m confident that I gave the route everything I had. In this, I am triumphant.

To get involved and donate online to Paige’s cause in Russia, visit http://www.crowdrise.com/Leadnowtourrussia

Check back next month for a video and update about Location #3. And stay tuned for the video of Paige’s time in Russia. FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video . 

Location #1: SOUTH AFRICA

Written on August 12, 2013 at 1:26 pm , by

Paige Claassen goes on a run through Africa

A morning run above the valley where Paige climbs each day. Photo credit Jon Glassberg (LT11)

Rock climber Paige Claassen recaps her first stop on the Marmot Lead Now Tour, a global tour to inspire people through rock climbing and raise $120,000 for charity organizations.

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By Paige Claassen

Our car flies down the N-1, South Africa’s primary highway, but my mind races even faster. After traveling 48 hours from the United States to Johannesburg, I have no idea what to expect from this country of which I’ve heard only about lions and muggings. I’m here to rock climb, so I assume I’m in for an adventure, but as we exit left (South Africans drive on the opposite side) onto a dirt road, I’m immediately immersed in a culture outside the realm of my dreams.

A few hours after landing, I’m welcomed into the home of a friend I’d met only through emails and loaded into the car for a safari. Forget jetlag—there are wild giraffe and zebra waiting in the backyard. Within a week, I’ve learned some local lingo (‘sawubona’ means ‘hello’ in Zulu), the difference between an American BBQ and a South African braai (namely patience, because the braai requires hours of fire preparation to cook tender ostrich meat and traditional spiced beef sausage), and most notably, the kindness and generosity of the South African people, regardless of color. Much of the country is poor, but less violent than portrayed in American media, so awareness and forethought are the best safety tools for travellers. Folks wave on the street as they walk home with wood for the evening’s fire piled on their head. Friends share tasty meals in their homes. And the local climbers invited us to “develop” a new climbing area by making “first ascents”, or being the first person to ever climb a route.

Paige climbs next to Boven’s iconic waterfall. Photo credit Jon Glassberg (LT11)

Paige climbs next to Boven’s iconic waterfall. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

While in South Africa, I had the opportunity to make the first ascent of a route called Digital Warfare, graded 5.14, one of the top grades among female climbers.  This was a special opportunity because I’d never been the first person to complete a route, especially one at my physical limit. Digital Warfare required strong fingers, endurance, and a steady mind. To prepare, I climbed as many easier routes as I could to build confidence and went on runs through the tall African grasses to improve my endurance.

By completing this climb, I hope to bring awareness to an organization that has grown very dear to my heart. Room to Read provides school libraries in developing countries with resources and reading materials so that young students can receive an education. Upon visiting one of Room to Read’s libraries in the rural countryside, I learned that 50% of the elementary age students have been orphaned by HIV/AIDS. When a little girl named Angel, who had moments ago asked me how she could overcome her fear of climbing to the top of a mountain, asked “when are you coming back?” I knew that this would not be my last time in South Africa. I will certainly be back, hopefully with new knowledge about how I can help enthusiastic children like Angel, who dream of lifting their own communities out of poverty.

During a visit to Room to Read, children of all ages displayed their reading skills in both English and native South African languages. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

During a visit to Room to Read, children of all ages displayed their reading skills in both English and native South African languages. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

 

Paige coaches under privileged children in one of the roughest suburbs of Johannesburg. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

Paige coaches under privileged children in one of the roughest suburbs of Johannesburg. Photo by Jon Glassberg (LT11).

To get involved and donate online to Paige’s Room to Read fundraiser, visit http://www.crowdrise.com/SouthAfrica-RoomtoRead

Check back next month for a video and update about Location #2: RUSSIA.

Stay tuned for the inspiring video of Paige’s time in South Africa. FitnessMagazine.com, with thanks to Marmot and Louder Than 11, will have the first-look exclusive video later this week. Check back soon!

Update: WATCH the amazing video of Paige in South Africa!

Giving Back Through Yoga

Written on September 4, 2012 at 9:20 am , by

The Yoga Aid World Challenge begins early in Sydney. Talk about a great view! (Photo courtesy of The Yoga Aid Foundation)

Written by Dionne Evans, editorial intern

By now, we know there’s an array of ways you can lend a helping hand to your favorite charity: completing a race and fundraising, volunteering, or donating no-longer-used products are just a few. But what about moving into downward dog or conquering the handstand? Yep, that’s an option now, too.

 

The Yoga Aid Foundation, an international nonprofit organization, is known for holding yoga events in the name of raising funds for various charities. Started by Clive Mayhew and wife Eriko Kinoshita, the foundation hosts traveling events through “The Challenge” series.

The Challenge is an event led by a set of 12 instructors who, for two hours, practice yoga to raise money for selected charity partners. But that’s not all: On September 9, The Foundation is dreaming big.

Hosting the first Yoga Aid World Challenge, this 24-hour yoga relay incorporates prestigious yoga teachers, like Shiva Rea, who will raise money for 15 humanitarian-based charities. The goal for this event is to raise $1 million in donations – all of which will go to the chosen charities. Taking place in over 200 locations in 20 different countries, the worldwide relay will start at 8 a.m. in Sydney, Australia and end at 6 p.m. in Los Angeles. Sessions last two hours and are free of charge, though a donation is strongly encouraged.

For more details and to see a list of the chosen charities: visit their website.

Now you tell us: What’s your favorite way to give back?