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How to Fight Allergy Season and Still Sweat Outside

Getting outdoors for a workout is great, especially after the polar vortex we were all trapped in this winter. But when you're an allergy sufferer, sweating amidst pollen is, well, less than ideal, and it can wreak havoc all over your immune system. So if you're sniffling, sneezing and coughing your way through daily routines, heed this advice from our favorite weatherman, Sam Champion. Yep, turns out weather patterns play a major role in your workout schedule.

Find the right meds. As easy as it may be, grabbing meds from your allergy-suffering bestie isn't the best road to travel. Their allergies may stem from a different type of pollen or have high counts in a different season, or they may experience more or less severe symptoms than you. Champion suggests touching base with your doc, and shop around before settling on a solution. Whether it's over the counter or prescription, chances are you'll find something that provides serious relief.

Protect your peepers. You already know inhaling pollen isn't the best, but keeping your eyes clear is just as important. "Pollen can come through any mucus membrane that's open, so you have to worry about not only breathing it in when you're running, but not allowing it to be absorbed through your eyes," says Champion. Invest in a solid pair of sunglasses to keep in the clear—we like Oakley's Break Points.

You don't need to be an early bird. "The old-fashioned wisdom was that you need to get out in the morning before pollen counts get too high," says Champion. But if you're heading into windy weather, it doesn't matter much—"pollen is still active in the morning, and wind will kick that pollen up." Check your local pollen count as soon as you wake up to determine when it's going to be best to sweat.

Know your area. "Pollen is very, very local and though it can travel for 30 to 60 miles easy in the wind, you need to know what's happening in your region," advises Champion. The Weather Channel, where Champion now works, pulls up those numbers by zip code, making it an easy search. Unfortunately, there isn't a general scale of what's "too high," Champion says, but paying attention to your symptoms is key. Which leads me to my next point...

Watch your symptoms. Notice tons of, er, snot build-up going on? It may be time to head indoors. If that's coupled with swollen eyes, your body is trying to tell you to quit. "When your body is building mucus, it's trying to fight the pollen," explains Champion. "It's trying to grab that pollen and get it out of your system because it's an irritant." If you still want to get your cardio on, try these no-boredom cardio routines.

Run in the rain. Besides the fact that it's just plain fun (come on, you did it as a kid!), rain is an allergy-sufferer's best friend. "Rain is like a giant filter," says Champion. "If you put a water filter on your tap, you get clear water out and all the gunky stuff is separated. And that's what rain does to air; rain cleans it. So right after the rain, no matter what the pollen count is, boom—get outside and do your run."

Keep your home clean. We're not saying you don't, but are you keeping pollen out of the house? I, for one, have no idea if I am. Champion's quick tip to find out: grab one of those cute throw pillows on your couch and give it a good slap. If dust or little particles pop up and appear (you can see them really well in sunlight), then pollen is in the home. Champion uses Febreze's Fabric Refresher Allergen Reducer to take action when that happens. "After I spray the fabric surfaces, it forms a protective shield, almost like a net. If I hit the pillow again, nothing will show up." Basically, that shield is locking the dust and pollen into the pillow until you get around to vacuuming it, which will remove about 95 percent of the nasty stuff. Phew.

More from FITNESS: 

5 Seasonal Allergy Remedies

6 Outdoor Workout Hazards 

How to Train with a Running Buddy 

 

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