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10 Tips That'll Help You Finally Become a Morning Runner

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    Lay Everything Out The Night Before

    Not just your sports bra and shoes. Everything, right down to your headphones and keys. "I set out everything the night before my runs," says Christina Musso, 28. "This way I don't even have to think about it in the morning—and it gives me a few extra minutes to sleep." (Just be sure to double-check the weather before heading out!)

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    Keep Your Motivation In Sight

    "I have all my race bibs hanging on the wall opposite my bed, so it's the first thing I see when I open my eyes in the morning," says Liysa Faye Mendels, 29. "Starting my day seeing a reminder of all the hard work I've already put in makes it much easier to get back out there."

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    Enlist A Buddy To Hold You Accountable

    "Plan to meet a friend for a run, and hold each other accountable," says Jessica Snider-Rodriguez, 27. "If you bail, your friend will think you're a flake! Or you'll have major FOMO when your friend posts that awesome sunrise photo that you missed. That should help kick things into gear."

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    Go To Bed Earlier

    "Nothing good happens after 10 pm anyway," says Caitlin Dilena, 28. "The earlier bedtime will suck for about a month, but be strict with when you want to go to bed and when you want to wake up, even on the weekends. Eventually your body will just adjust."

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    Put Your Alarm Across The Room

    "It's tempting to sleep with your phone underneath your pillow," says Alexandra Burke, 27. "But by stashing my alarm elsewhere, I have to physically get out of bed to turn it off. Then, I'm already out of bed, so I may as well put my sneakers on and start moving."

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    Cut Yourself Some Slack

    "Don't go from waking up at 8:00 every morning to trying to make 6 am runs happen five days a week," says Mendels. "Change takes time. Schedule your week in advance. If you know you'll have the next day to sleep in, it's less tempting to skip that super early run if you know you have every day planned out."

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    Set Goals And Plan Accordingly

    "When I'm training for an 'A race,' I create a personal goal," says Laura Ann Walsh, 32. "I write it down and think about it every time I'm tempted to hit snooze."

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    Create An Evening Routine

    "Bring awareness to your evening activities," says Mendels. "Instead of mindlessly binge-watching TV as soon as you get home, get into the habit of letting yourself watch just one hour of TV or reading for 30 minutes before getting into bed by 9 pm." Bonus trick: Implement an end-of-day activity, like relaxing with your legs up on the wall for a few minutes, that means it's time for lights out.

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    Give Yourself A Buffer

    "I set my alarm for 25 minutes earlier than I actually want to wake up," says Dana Karassik, 31. "That way, if I do hit snooze, I can gradually get up and I haven't really lost any time."

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    Don't Bother Going Back To Sleep

    "If your alarm is going off and you hear it, you're already awake," says Jessica Snider-Rodriguez, 27. "You're basically already awake, and you're not going to go back into a quality sleep. You may as well get up and be productive."