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Abby Wambach on ‘Rise As One’ Series and How Mental Grit Gets You Through Anything

Written on March 25, 2014 at 7:18 pm , by

She’s the highest all-time goal scorer in women’s professional soccer, and one of the toughest players to hit the field. Teammates like Mia Hamm and Christie Rampone have declared her a warrior; someone they love working with. She was a part of the winning 1999 World Cup team, and plans on bringing home another title in in 2015. I’m talking about superstar athlete Abby Wambach, who took a few minutes to chat about the new documentary series she’s a part of and how she mentally pushes through crazy-intense workouts day after day. Take it away, Abby!

What can viewers expect if they tune in to the new documentary series Rise As One?

It’s a six-part series that showcases different stories in and around the world that relate not only to sport, but how the human heart can actually push forward a nation or team to be bigger or better than they ever thought possible.

Your episode airs tonight—why did you want to work on it? 

My episode is called Power of Unity and it’s about the Japanese team and what they went through in the 2011 World Cup [four months after a tsunami hit their country]. That was a time in my life where what I experienced and what the Japanese team experienced was, I thought, very different. I think it’s really important [for people to watch] because it’s easy to get stuck inside your own bubble. To realize there are bigger and more important things going on in the world than a game is important, but then to also be able to take comfort and you know, grieve, in the game is also a really big positive. I think the country needed that.

Your teammates always speak very highly of you. Anyone in particular that you really look up to? 

I feel honored that they feel that way about me because I feel the exact same way about all of them. As time goes on, your body ages and you have to let the younger kids run a bit more. I’m honored that I’ve gotten to play as long as I have. And Mia [Hamm] was one of those players, at that time of my career, that really shaped how I looked at the game and how I played it.

Your workouts must be insane to play strong for such long periods of time. How do you mentally prepare for a game, or an intense workout? 

It’s hard to consistently put your body through torture, in some ways. You’re pushing your body to the limit almost every single day. And that can get tiring. Not feeling that you can ever have an easy day becomes a state of mind; being tired and being exhausted becomes a state of being. You have to prepare to be in pain for a 90-minute game.

Is there anything in particular you do, then, when it seems to become unbearable – the physical pain?

It really is mind over matter. My teammates and I, I’m proud of the fact that we can push through exceptional amounts of stress. If you learn to accept the pain and the fact that it’s this constant that will be there throughout the workout, that will really help you push through and do what you need to do.

Tune in to see Rise As One tonight, March 25th at 8pm ET on FOX Sports 1. 

Photo courtesy of AbbyWambach.com

More from FITNESS: 

Soccer Star Christie Rampone Spills Her Do-It-All Secrets

Chatting with Mia Hamm About Team USA

Landon Donovan’s Skin-Saving Tips

Hot Topic Tuesday: Can Documentaries Help Curb Obesity?

Written on July 31, 2012 at 11:22 am , by

Will a documentary series open people's eyes to serious health issues? (Photo courtesy of HBO)

Written by Laura Cofsky, editorial intern

In America, growing waistlines have become a big problem. With nearly 70 percent of the population being overweight or obese, it seems like it’ll take a village to solve the dilemma — or maybe a country.

The HBO documentary series The Weight of the Nation stresses that, between ads for unhealthy foods, the expense of buying more nutritious options, the lack of workout spaces and a national shortage of produce (according to one of the experts, there’s not enough available for everyone to eat the recommended amount of fruits and veggies), losing excess fat is more than a matter of willpower. But dropping the extra weight is important: the hosts argue that obesity leads to five of the main causes of death —diabetes and kidney disease included— and costs businesses billions of dollars in health care costs each year.

The three-disc DVD set, which hits shelves today, may be a wake up call for some. The creators, in association with Centers for Disease Control and the National Institute of Health, look at the issue from multiple different angles by consulting with various experts, discuss the consequences and possible solutions, and interview people who successfully lost weight and kept it off to give you an arsenal of information.

Now you tell us: What do you know about the obesity epidemic, and do you think documentaries like this can be useful?