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10 Signs a Fitness Product is Just a Gimmick

Written on May 5, 2011 at 11:15 am , by

Photo courtesy of SparkPeople

Photo courtesy of SparkPeople

Want to avoid a scam? Check out the latest advice from SparkPeople!

Fitness infomercials promise a lot: dramatic weight-loss, big results, a six pack in 30 days! But unfortunately, most of them do not deliver on those promises. When those ads are so intriguing and believable, how do you know which new products deliver and which ones leave much to be desired?

To separate the real fitness tools from the get-fit-quick scams, just ask yourself the 10 questions below. If you answer, “yes” even one of them, save your money: It probably won’t give you the results it promises.

10 Must-Ask Questions before You Buy Another Exercise Product

1. Does it sound too good to be true?
If it does, it probably is. The people behind these products and ads really are marketing geniuses. In a matter of seconds, they harness your attention. Within minutes, you believe that you can have the body of a fitness model in just minutes a day, too. Here’s another trick: When calculating how many calories a new product burns, many companies will test their product on a very large, muscular man to get an inflated number, which skews the calorie burn for most people.

2. Does it target just one body part?
The truth is that “spot reduction” doesn’t work.  If the Booty Blaster on TV promises that you’ll lose inches off your rear, it’s lying! There is no way to slim down, lose water weight or trim inches from a specific area of the body just by working that body part. If you have body fat that is hiding your muscles, only a calorie-controlled diet combined with a sound exercise program (that also burns calories via cardio) will solve the problem. The same goes for abs machines that promise to give you a six-pack or whittle away your love handles . Sure, you can make your abs stronger with strengthening and toning exercises (which is awesome!), but you won’t go from a size 12 to a size 2 overnight.

3. Does it fail to mention diet or nutrition?
Nutrition is such an integral part of losing inches, building muscle and dropping weight. If a product or fitness program doesn’t address the nutrition side of the weight-loss equation (i.e. a reduced-calorie diet), then you can pretty much guarantee that it’s a gimmick exaggerating its results. All the exercise in the world will not change your body if your diet isn’t also in line with your goals.

4. Is it really that different?
What is most interesting about infomercials is that the products and programs for sale seem so new and revolutionary! The marketing on them really gets you pumped up! But step back and ask yourself if the gizmo, DVD or training plan really is special or if it’s just being marketed as something exciting.

5. Are the dramatic results what interest me?
If you answer yes to this question, run away from the phone. Do not “act now” and order the product. If you’re desperate to lose weight and the claims of rapid weight loss or dramatic results are persuading you to pick up that phone to order, take a deep breath and remind yourself that buying the product itself won’t help you lose weight. Using it regularly, along with a healthy diet and sound fitness program will. And if the product or program doesn’t interest you at all, then it’s probably not a smart buy, no matter how effective it appears to be. For example, if you have two left feet and would never be caught dead on a dance floor, ordering a set of hip-hop dance DVDs probably won’t work for you—even if it has worked for others.

Continued: The Other 5 Questions to Ask Yourself before Buying


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