What Type of Running Shoes Should I Wear with My Orthotics?
I have been told that I have collapsed arches. I have prescription orthotics that I use in my running shoes. Should I buy a neutral running shoe, or more of a stability running shoe to use with my orthotics?
Submitted by jenary2

Place an orthotic insert only in a neutral shoe, which is a sneaker without all the foot-bolstering bells and whistles, says Jeffrey Ross, M.D., a podiatrist in Houston. "An orthotic adds arch support and stabilizes your heel and forefoot -- everything you need for your foot if it overpronates," Dr. Ross says. This means that putting an orthotic into a stabilit-style shoe, which already has those features built in, would be over kill. "The double support would prevent you from pronating enough," he says. Your foot needs some rolling inward and outward for a natural strike and push-off.

Answered by FitnessEditor
Community Answers (12)

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Submitted by heba_sun2012

Imagine running on the outsides of your feet! In essence, this is what you're doing if you use an orthotic in a stabilization shoe. I wore an orthotic all through college, but continued to have shin splints. The big aha moment came after buying a pair of stabilization-performance shoes, and leaving the orthotics out. I couldn't afford a new set, but my shin splints disappeared! Buy the neutral shoe, or ditch the orthotic and wear the stabilization shoe. http://fitness-for-everyone.com
Submitted by fitxpert

Imagine running on the outsides of your feet! In essence, this is what you're doing if you use an orthotic in a stabilization shoe. I wore an orthotic all through college, but continued to have shin splints. The big aha moment came after buying a pair of stabilization-performance shoes, and leaving the orthotics out. I couldn't afford a new set, but my shin splints disappeared! Buy the neutral shoe, or ditch the orthotic and wear the stabilization shoe. http://fitness-for-everyone.com
Submitted by fitxpert

I'm a Brooks addict, so when I got my custom orthotics I got Brooks Dyads because they are a neutral shoe that was recommended by my physical therapist, and I haven't looked back since.
Submitted by axotiffany

yes and more power thats all I need
Submitted by michellelieuw

Kangoo Jumps are best used to enhance the work outs that you are already comfortable with such as running, group aerobic classes and even athletic training. The shoes were originally created to protect the users knees, ankles and back but are evolving into a tool that can enhance even the simplest of workouts. http://www.easyexercisesolutions.com http://www.ezexercisesolutions.com
Submitted by artsigler

Places like Transport shoes, See Jane Run and possibly sportsauthority offer professional help from actual runners to help you find what you need. Check out runnersworld.com too for further advice.
Submitted by cmwwinterbauer

It really depends on what kind of shoe you get. Stability, neatural minimal or any other type of trainer. It truly is a matter of comfort as each person is physically different, from degree of pronation, body weight, length of stride, physical ability, what the shoe will be worn during, if your feet point inward/outward and more. I recommend going to running shoe/attire stores that offer the help of a professional and a tred mill and such to assess what you need.
Submitted by cmwwinterbauer

I use New Balance sneakers with the Abzorb and Rollbar features - recommended by my podiatrist for overpronation. These work great with my orthotic inserts!
Submitted by luvzmycatz

My podiatrist suggested Asics or Saucony as very orthotics friendly shoes. I wear them on a daily basis for my everyday on my feet all day life. I also wear Ryka when I work out (I am not a runner, but a step, HiiT, kickbox, freak) and all of my different types of Rykas have been very compatible with my orthotics.
Submitted by Deily

Running shoes that have a hard back. (where your heel should sit.) brands like new balance,asics and soome nikes. my physical therapist told me these brands. I have orthotics myself.
Submitted by aly_kat1995